IMPACTS ON THE LIVES OF PEOPLE LIVING WITH HIV: CRIMINAL CHARGES FOR HIV NON-DISCLOSURE, TRANSMISSION AND/OR EXPOSURE

My doctoral research intersects at three fields of study: critical criminology, surveillance studies, and the social organization of knowledge on HIV and AIDS. My dissertation addresses the experiences of people who have been charged and/or prosecuted in relation to not disclosing their HIV-positive status to sex partners in a series of qualitative interviews across Canada.

Through my dissertation, I am examining the disjuncture between the lives of people living with HIV and how they come to be known, defined, classified, and understood as risks and criminals through a range of diverse forms of authoritative and expert forms of knowledge. My work aims to understand the intertwining governing practices and processes of various institutions and actors, such as those of public health, the criminal justice system, corrections institutions, policing, civil society groups and community-based organizations.  Through this research  I hope to be able to provide insights into how people's lives are organized in relation to institutions and how we can then act proactively to intervene for progressive change.

My doctoral studies have been funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) doctoral HIV/AIDS Community-Based Research Award (2013-2016) and the Faculty of Arts and Sciences Graduate Fellowship, Concordia University (2012-2014).

 

See articles featuring my emerging dissertation research by Le Devoir, DailyXtra, Now Magazine, the HIV Justice Network and Concordia University's The Link newspaper!